Assimilating Problematic Experiences through Cognitive Behaviour Therapy in Adolescence with Social Anxiety Disorder: A Case Study

Authors

  • Hui Ni Chee Department of Neurosciences, School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 16150 Kota Bharu, Kelantan, Malaysia
  • Azizah Othman Department of Paediatrics, School of Medical Sciences,Universiti Sains Malaysia, 16150 Kota Bharu, Kelantan, Malaysia
  • Hafidah Umar Department of Neurosciences, School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 16150 Kota Bharu, Kelantan, Malaysia
  • Mohamed Faiz Mohamed Mustafar Department of Neurosciences, School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 16150 Kota Bharu, Kelantan, Malaysia

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.51407/mjpch.v29i3.276

Keywords:

Anxiety, CBT, adolescents, , assimilation

Abstract

Introduction: Social anxiety is common among adolescents, and Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) is an evidence-based intervention. We present a case of a 17-year-old girl, called Z, who was diagnosed with Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD) and undergone CBT. Z presented with school refusal and social avoidance due to excessive negative thoughts about herself and others thinking badly of her. Methods: A brief psychoeducational-based CBT was conducted over 10 weekly sessions with the emphasis on psychoeducation, behavioural and cognitive skills training, and practices at home, as well as reflective discussion to modify negative beliefs, increase the use of positive coping strategies, and understanding of problematic experiences. Pre-intervention scores were compared to mid and post-intervention using Beck Youth Inventory (BYI) and Assimilation of Problematic Experiences Scales (APES). Outcomes: Pre-intervention BYI scores revealed an extremely elevated level of anxiety and depression symptoms, anger, and disruptive behaviours, with a much lower-than-average level of self-concept. APES revealed a score of 1/7 at the pre-intervention phase. Towards the end of the session, Z reported significantly reduced scores in anxiety, depression, and anger symptoms. The scores on the APES demonstrated an increased awareness, understanding and clarification towards her problematic experience, as well as application of her understanding in problem-solving efforts. Conclusion: It is apparent that CBT has a positive effect in adolescents with social anxiety.

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Author Biographies

Hui Ni Chee, Department of Neurosciences, School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 16150 Kota Bharu, Kelantan, Malaysia

Department of Psychology, Faculty of Human Development, Universiti Pendidikan Sultan Idris, Malaysia

Azizah Othman, Department of Paediatrics, School of Medical Sciences,Universiti Sains Malaysia, 16150 Kota Bharu, Kelantan, Malaysia

Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia, Health Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia

Mohamed Faiz Mohamed Mustafar, Department of Neurosciences, School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 16150 Kota Bharu, Kelantan, Malaysia

Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia, Health Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia

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Published

2023-12-05

How to Cite

Chee, H. N., Othman, A., Umar, H., & Mohamed Mustafar, M. F. (2023). Assimilating Problematic Experiences through Cognitive Behaviour Therapy in Adolescence with Social Anxiety Disorder: A Case Study . Malaysian Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, 29(3), 28-32. https://doi.org/10.51407/mjpch.v29i3.276

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Section

Case Report